Public Intoxication –

Criminal defense attorneys are happy to help when someone gets into trouble with the law – indeed, its pretty much the job description.  But with football season now on us (can’t wait to hear Smokey howl), I’ve been trying to focus posts on equipping loyal readers with knowledge on how to stay out of trouble: past posts on DUIs (like this one or this one); recently posting to my Facebook page the Tennessee Highway Patrol’s list of checkpoints and their announcement of a “No Refusal Weekend” this Labor Day Weekend (click here for the press release); last week’s post on open containers; and now this post on the Tennessee Criminal Charge of Public Intoxication.

Here is the Tennessee statute on Public Intoxication for your review:

39-17-310.  Public intoxication.
  (a) A person commits the offense of public intoxication who appears in a public place under the influence of a controlled substance, controlled substance analogue or any other intoxicating substance to the degree that:
   (1) The offender may be endangered;
   (2) There is endangerment to other persons or property; or
   (3) The offender unreasonably annoys people in the vicinity.
(b) A violation of this section is a Class C misdemeanor.

As one of Tennessee’s shorter statutes, Public Intoxication does not require too much breaking down.  In Tennessee, you are guilty of Public Intoxication if you are (1) in a public place, (2) under the influence of “a controlled substance, controlled substance analogue, or any other intoxication substance” (aka, it does not have to be alcohol – for instance, marijuana and “meth” are examples of controlled substances”) and you are (3) a danger to yourself, others, others’ property, or are annoying those around you.  If found guilty of Public Intoxication, it is a Class C misdemeanor (meaning punishment can include up to 30 days in jail, court costs, and a fine of up to $3,000).

However, just because it is one of Tennessee’s shorter statutes does not mean there are not defenses if you or someone you know is charged with this crime.  Often a Criminal Defense attorney can work out a resolution far better than the maximum punishments listed above, though what can be done varies on a case-by-case basis.

And hopefully now you better know how to keep yourself (and loved ones) out of trouble, so you can fully enjoy the game!

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The author of Defending Tennessee is Nicholas W. Lee, Esq., an attorney in Knoxville, Tennessee (please click here for contact information).  Also, please feel free to visit Mr. Lee’s website,www.TNLawyerLee.com, or follow his page on Facebook for updates as to his law practice or new posts to Defending Tennessee by clicking here.

The information on this site is general information and should not be construed as legal advice. Every case is unique and you should consult with an attorney in your state about the specific details of your case. Nothing on this site or in correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as forming an attorney-client relationship and information you send prior to the forming of an attorney-client relationship may not be kept confidential. Neither this site nor correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as a promise nor as undertaking a duty regarding you or your case. Nicholas Lee and his agents are not retained as your legal counsel unless a valid written Representation Agreement is reached regarding your specific case.

Copyright © 2014. Nicholas W. Lee, Attorney at Law. All rights reserved. This site’s content may not be used without the prior written consent of Nicholas Lee.

“Defending Tennessee” is a privately-ran legal blog and is not a public legal aid agency.

The Tennessee Open Container Law(s)

 

With football time in Tennessee rapidly approaching (as of the time of this article, 9 days, 2 hours, and 23 minutes to kickoff at Neyland Stadium), it seems like a good time to clear up some confusion many people have and maybe keep a few loyal readers out of trouble: what is the “Open Container Law?”

In general, open container laws are laws regulating open containers of alcoholic beverages in public locations (which can include your vehicle).  Here I will try to clear up two of the most common confusions I run into regarding Open Container Laws in Tennessee: (1) what does the Tennessee Open Container Law say, and (2) is it enough to just comply with the Tennessee Open Container Law?

**A quick tip: excerpts of statute are inserted in this post for your review.  However, if you desire to skip them over, they can be easily identified by their increased indentation.

The Tennessee Open Container Law

So what does the Tennessee Open Container law say?  That law is set forth in Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-10-416:

55-10-416.  Open container law.
  (a)  (1) No driver shall consume any alcoholic beverage or beer or possess an open container of alcoholic beverage or beer while operating a motor vehicle in this state.
   (2) For purposes of this section:
      (A) “Open container” means any container containing alcoholic beverages or beer, the contents of which are immediately capable of being consumed or the seal of which has been broken;
      (B) An open container is in the possession of the driver when it is not in the possession of any passenger and is not located in a closed glove compartment, trunk or other nonpassenger area of the vehicle; and
      (C) A motor vehicle is in operation if its engine is operating, whether or not the motor vehicle is moving.
(b)  (1) A violation of this section is a Class C misdemeanor, punishable by fine only.
   (2) For a violation of this section, a law enforcement officer shall issue a citation in lieu of continued custody, unless the offender refuses to sign and accept the citation, as provided in § 40-7-118.
(c) This section shall not be construed to prohibit any municipality, by ordinance, or any county, by resolution, from prohibiting the passengers in a motor vehicle from consuming or possessing an alcoholic beverage or beer in an open container during the operation of the vehicle by its driver, or be construed to limit the penalties authorized by law for violation of the ordinance or resolution.

For those not used to reading through dusty law books all day, allow me to emphasize Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-10-416(a)(1), which sets forth what you can NOT do: “No driver shall consume any alcoholic beverage or beer or possess an open container of alcoholic beverage or beer while operating a motor vehicle in this state.” If you are deemed to have violated the Tennessee Open Container Law, the statute dictates that it is a “Class C misdemeanor, punishable by fine only.”  See Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-10-416(b)(1).  And fines for a Class C misdemeanor usually cap out at $50.

Is it enough to just comply with the Tennessee Open Container Law

Obviously it isn’t enough to just comply with one law, you have to comply with all of them, but I actually asked this question to bring light to the fact that you have to comply with federal law, state law, AND city ordinances (to name a few).

For example, in addition to the Tennessee Open Container Statute, Knoxville also has an open container law located in the Knoxville, Tennessee, Code of Ordinances Sect. 4-1 (located below).

Sec. 4-1. Possession or consumption on certain property prohibited or restricted.

(a) For the purposes of this section, an open container is one which has any opening through which its contents may pass in order to be consumed by any person.

(b) It shall be unlawful for any person to:

(1) Possess an open container containing beer or alcoholic beverages or to consume beer or alcoholic beverages on the premises of any retail beer sales outlet which does not have an on-premises permit;

(2) Possess an open container containing beer or alcoholic beverages, or consume beer or alcoholic beverages, on any public street, sidewalk, playground, school property, public park or recreational facility or public parking lot within the corporate limits of the city, unless such possession or consumption is exempted pursuant to subsection (d) of this section;

(3) Possess an open container of beer or consume beer on any privately owned parking lot held open to use by the public; or

(4) Possess an open container of beer or consume beer in Chilhowee Park or the Knoxville Zoological Park.

(c) Consumption of alcoholic beverages may be permitted on the Lower Second Creek site in connection with a city-sponsored or authorized event in accordance with a permit granted by the city.

(d) Possession of an open container of beer and the consumption of beer may be permitted in the areas specified in section 4-76 of this Code, provided that such possession or consumption is authorized by a special permit granted by the beer board in accordance with section 4-76.

 As you can see, Ordinance Sect. 4-1 makes a number of activities unlawful, including making it unlawful to “[p]ossess an open container containing beer or alcoholic beverages, or consume beer or alcoholic beverages, on any public street, sidewalk, playground, school property, public park or recreational facility or public parking lot within the corporate limits of the city, unless such possession or consumption is exempted pursuant to subsection (d) of this section.”  So it is that, tailgating in Knoxville for example, you could get into trouble for a violation of Knoxville’s Open Container Ordinance, even if you aren’t in trouble for a violation of the Tennessee open Container Statute.

In Closing

I hope this clears up a little confusion surrounding Open Container Laws in Tennessee.  And if tailgating (or not), hopefully this will help you to avoid your good times being dampened by tickets and fines.

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The author of Defending Tennessee is Nicholas W. Lee, Esq., an attorney in Knoxville, Tennessee (please click here for contact information).  Also, please feel free to visit Mr. Lee’s website,www.TNLawyerLee.com, or follow his page on Facebook for updates as to his law practice or new posts to Defending Tennessee by clicking here.

The information on this site is general information and should not be construed as legal advice. Every case is unique and you should consult with an attorney in your state about the specific details of your case. Nothing on this site or in correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as forming an attorney-client relationship and information you send prior to the forming of an attorney-client relationship may not be kept confidential. Neither this site nor correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as a promise nor as undertaking a duty regarding you or your case. Nicholas Lee and his agents are not retained as your legal counsel unless a valid written Representation Agreement is reached regarding your specific case.

Copyright © 2014. Nicholas W. Lee, Attorney at Law. All rights reserved. This site’s content may not be used without the prior written consent of Nicholas Lee.

“Defending Tennessee” is a privately-ran legal blog and is not a public legal aid agency.

Lasers – A New Way to Catch Drunk Drivers?

Image from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/08/device-laser-alcohol-cars_n_5453696.html "An illustration of how two lasers involved in the study reflected off of mirrors to reveal the presence of alcohol vapors in a test car."

Image from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/08/device-laser-alcohol-cars_n_5453696.html
“An illustration of how two lasers involved in the study reflected off of mirrors to reveal the presence of alcohol vapors in a test car.”

One of the greatest joys of writing this law blog is keeping up to date on current issues and developments in the law.  Today’s short post deals with an intriguing technological development that its developers hope will aid police in detecting individuals who are drinking and driving.

In Poland, scientists have developed a new “laser-based device that can detect alcohol vapor–like that exhaled by someone who’s been drinking–inside a car as it passes by,” reports Jacqueline Howard of The Huffington Post (to view the full article, click here).  While this device is not exactly close to being implemented in Tennessee, it is interesting to think for a second through some possibilities and ramifications of this device.

Of course, new technology aiding police in apprehending suspects is not a novel concept.  However, radar guns, breathalyzers, and any other system is susceptible to making mistakes.  The proposed laser device will have its own problems to work through, such as what if you are driving and your passenger is intoxicated (but you are not)? Just that simple hypothetical situation might draw into question the reasonableness of a stop based on such technology (if more than one person is present in the car).

To read more about this intriguing technological development, click here.

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The author of TNLawyerLee is Nicholas W. Lee, Esq., an attorney in Knoxville, Tennessee.  If you or someone you know need an attorney, please click herefor Mr. Lee’s contact information and contact him today for a free consultation.  Also, please feel free to visit Mr. Lee’s website,www.TNLawyerLee.com or follow his page on Facebook for updates as to his law practice or new posts to TNLawyerLee by clicking here.

The information on this site is general information and should not be construed as legal advice. Every case is unique and you should consult with an attorney in your state about the specific details of your case. Nothing on this site or in correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as forming an attorney-client relationship and information you send prior to the forming of an attorney-client relationship may not be kept confidential. Neither this site nor correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as a promise nor as undertaking a duty regarding you or your case. Nicholas Lee and his agents are not retained as your legal counsel unless a valid written Representation Agreement is reached regarding your specific case.

Copyright © 2014. Nicholas W. Lee, Attorney at Law. All rights reserved. This site’s content may not be used without the prior written consent of Nicholas Lee.

How are Forced Blood Draws Legally Justified?

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This last week a concerned citizen learned about “No Refusal” blood draw checkpoints and contacted me asking how can that be legal.  In short, the answer is that this is a sentiment shared by many among the criminal defense bar.

In Tennessee, “[a]ny person who drives a motor vehicle in this state is deemed to have given consent to a test or tests for the purpose of determining the alcoholic content of that person’s blood, a test or tests for the purpose of determining the drug content of the person’s blood, or both tests.”  Tenn. Code Ann. 55-10-406(a)(1).  This is often referred to as “implied consent.”  Once upon a time, a citizen could refuse to allow blood to be removed from his or her own body to be used as evidence against him or herself, but not so much anymore.

In 2012, the implied consent law was modified to state that if a person refuses such a test, it is a violation of the implied consent law with possible punishments including (but not limited to) loss of your driver license and hefty fines.  But currently the situation is entirely possible where you could get pulled over, asked to submit to a blood test, you refuse the blood test, and yet one is taken anyways (a “forced blood draw”).

Courts have ruled that seizure of your very body (a.k.a. your blood) can be legal in many scenarios.  I imagine many readers may be screaming “but what about my right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures?!”   It is true that the Tennessee Supreme Court has ruled that “under both the federal and state constitutions, a warrantless search or seizure is presumed unreasonable, and evidence discovered as a result thereof is subject to suppression unless the State demonstrates that the search or seizure was conducted pursuant to one of the narrowly defined exceptions to the warrant requirement,” State v. Binette, 33 S.W.3d 215, 218 (Tenn. 2000) (quoting State v. Yeargan, 958 S.W.2d 626, 629 (Tenn. 1997)).  

However, that is speaking of warrantless searches and seizures, a.k.a. warrantless blood draws.  Many policing agencies have set up a procedure where a warrant is obtained from an on-call magistrate authorizing the blood draw if a person refuses.  However, even if a policing agency does not first obtain a warrant, if the particular circumstances of a situation are determined to be “exigent,” a forced blood draw may be constitutional.  See State v. Hutchinson (Tenn. Crim. App. 2013) and Missouri v. McNeely (2012).

There you have it.  Whether this author agrees with the justification, that is how forced blood draws are allowed in Tennessee.  However, as readers may be able to tell even from this elementary run-down of the Tennessee Implied Consent law (and as readers may already know from other TNLawyerLee articles on DUIs, like this one or this one), these cases can be fraught with complexities – if you or someone you know should ever find yourself facing a charge for DUI or Violation of the Implied Consent Law, speak with a lawyer in your area immediately.

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The author of TNLawyerLee is Nicholas W. Lee, Esq., an attorney in Knoxville, Tennessee.  If you or someone you know need an attorney, please click herefor Mr. Lee’s contact information and contact him today for a free consultation.  Also, please feel free to visit Mr. Lee’s website,www.TNLawyerLee.com or follow his page on Facebook for updates as to his law practice or new posts to TNLawyerLee by clicking here.

The information on this site is general information and should not be construed as legal advice. Every case is unique and you should consult with an attorney in your state about the specific details of your case. Nothing on this site or in correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as forming an attorney-client relationship and information you send prior to the forming of an attorney-client relationship may not be kept confidential. Neither this site nor correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as a promise nor as undertaking a duty regarding you or your case. Nicholas Lee and his agents are not retained as your legal counsel unless a valid written Representation Agreement is reached regarding your specific case.

Copyright © 2014. Nicholas W. Lee, Attorney at Law. All rights reserved. This site’s content may not be used without the prior written consent of Nicholas Lee.

 

DUIs: You Don’t Have to Be Driving or Under the Influence to be Charged

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It should come as no shock that I have written about DUIs previously (click here to read “DUI, or Driving Under the Influence;” here to read “DUI does not always equal Drunk Driving;” and here to read “6 Ways People Don’t Realize They Can Get Into Trouble for DUIs“).  But one thing I bring up in conversation from time to time still shocks listeners: that you don’t have to be driving or under the influence to be charged with a DUI.

Tennessee Code Annotate § 55-10-201 defines who is a party to (and therefore can be charged with) a DUI:

Every person who commits, attempts to commit, conspires to commit, or aids and abets in the commission of any act declared in chapter 8 or parts 1-5 of this chapter to be a crime, whether individually or in connection with one (1) or more other persons, or as a principal, agent or accessory, is guilty of the offense, and every person who falsely, fraudulently, forcibly or willfully induces, causes, coerces, requires, permits or directs another to violate any provision of chapter 8 or parts 1-5 of this chapter is likewise guilty of the offense.

So what is one example of a way you could be charged with a DUI without being drunk or the driver?  What about if you were out with a friend?  You haven’t touched a drop of alcohol but your friend has.  What if you noticed that your friend appeared “tipsy” but he asked to drive and so you got into the passenger seat and let him?  DUI?

Think twice before you answer “no.”  This is pretty much what happened in the case of Williams v. State, 352 S.W.2d  230 (Tenn. 1961).  Click here to read the Court’s full opinion in Williams, but in that case the Tennessee Supreme Court held that the person who aided and abetted the person who actually was driving under the influence was also guilty of a DUI.  And, from personal experience, cases do arise where a person is charged with DUI when they were not driving and/or under the influence.

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The author of TNLawyerLee is Nicholas W. Lee, Esq., an attorney in Knoxville, Tennessee.  If you or someone you know need an attorney, please click herefor Mr. Lee’s contact information and contact him today for a free consultation.  Also, please feel free to visit Mr. Lee’s website,www.TNLawyerLee.com or follow his page on Facebook for updates as to his law practice or new posts to TNLawyerLee by clicking here.

The information on this site is general information and should not be construed as legal advice. Every case is unique and you should consult with an attorney in your state about the specific details of your case. Nothing on this site or in correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as forming an attorney-client relationship and information you send prior to the forming of an attorney-client relationship may not be kept confidential. Neither this site nor correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as a promise nor as undertaking a duty regarding you or your case. Nicholas Lee and his agents are not retained as your legal counsel unless a valid written Representation Agreement is reached regarding your specific case.

Copyright © 2014. Nicholas W. Lee, Attorney at Law. All rights reserved. This site’s content may not be used without the prior written consent of Nicholas Lee.

6 Ways People Don’t Realize They Can Get Into Trouble for DUIs

Occasionally when I meet someone new, it comes up that I am an attorney who likes to focus his practice on Criminal Defense.  People ask me many of the same questions and, quite often, the topic turns to DUIs.  I have learned that people are often shocked by some of the things they learn and so I am posting some of the DUI facts people have found to be shocking:

1) You don’t have to be drinking to be charged with a DUI

I have written previously about how one does not have to drink alcohol to be charged with a DUI.  Essentially any substance that impairs your central nervous system could make you guilty of a DUI.  A person can be guilty of a DUI while under the influence of a number of substances, including (but being in no way limited to) alcohol, illegal drugs, over-the-counter drugs, and prescription drugs (even if legally prescribed).  Click here to read more on this topic.

2) You don’t have be be in an automobile to be charged with a DUI

The law states that a person in “any automobile or other motor driven vehicle” (emphasis added) might be charged with a DUI.  What qualifies as a “motor driven vehicle?”  That is an interesting question indeed.  Golf-cart?  A rascal?  Bicycle with a motor attached?  One of those children’s toys that look like a vehicle, they sit in it, and they can maybe max out at 2 miles-per-hour?  These questions lead to very interesting (and sometimes quite lengthy) discussions among Criminal Defense attorneys.  Suffice it here to say that if it moves and has a motor, it might be safer to avoid it altogether if you are intoxicated.

3) You don’t even have to be driving to be charged with Driving Under the Influence

Allow me to give you a scenario, one that some of you might recognize: you have been out drinking with friends and, when the night comes to an end, you think to yourself, “I am too intoxicated to drive.”  You decide to sleep it off for a while in your car before driving home.  You might even applaud yourself for a decision you think is quite responsible.

After you get into your car, you put your keys back in your pocket and go to sleep.  A little bit later, a police officer comes along, knocks on your window, and starts asking you a series of questions.  The officer then asks you to step out of the vehicle and asks you to perform a series of Field Sobriety Tests.  Is this officer thinking about arresting you of DUI?  “Surely not, I wasn’t even driving!” you might think to yourself.

Unfortunately, you would be wrong – that police officer might be considering whether to charge you with a DUI.  According to Tennessee’s DUI law, you needn’t have been driving to be guilty of a DUI.  In Tennessee, you can also be guilty of a DUI if you were in “physical control” of the automobile or motor driven vehicle.  While it is another interesting question in some DUI cases of whether a person was in physical control of their vehicle, the Tennessee Supreme Court set the precedent when the Court upheld in 1993 the DUI conviction of an individual who fell asleep in his automobile with the keys. See State v. Lawrence, 849 S.W.2d 761 (Tenn. 1993) (click here to read the case opinion in State v. Lawrence).

4) In fact, you don’t even have to be on a public road to be charged with a DUI

DUIs can occur on “any of the public roads and highways of the state, or on any streets or alleys, or while on the premises of any shopping center, trailer park or any apartment house complex, or any other premises that is generally frequented by the public at large . . . .”  This means that if you live in an apartment complex and drive to get your mail while intoxicated, even then you might be chargeable with a DUI.  If you’re at a bar and go outside to move your car, you might be chargeable with a DUI.  I could list examples all day.

5) “DUI by Consent” * –

Some of you might have heard of something called a “DUI by Consent.”  Often when people use this label, they are referring to Tennessee Code Annotated § 55-10-201, which defines “Parties to a crime.”  Specifically for this article, it defines who is a party to the crime of DUI: “[e]very person who commits, attempts to commit, conspires to commit, or aids or abets in the commission of any [DUI] . . . is guilty of [DUI].”  In essence, if you facilitate a DUI in any way, it is conceivable that you could be charged with a DUI yourself.  Something to think about before getting in a car with a drunk friend behind the wheel.  See Williams v. State, 352 S.W.2d 230 (Tenn. 1961) (click here to read the case opinion in Williams v. State).

6) “DUI by Ownership” * –

Again, some of you might have heard of something called a “DUI by Ownership.”  This often refers to Tennessee Code Annotated § 55-10-202, making it a Class C misdemeanor for “the owner, or any other person, employing or otherwise directing the driver of any vehicle to require or knowingly to permit the operation of the vehicle upon a highway in any manner contrary to law.”  There are many instances where this might become an issue, but should certainly be cause for concern if you allow someone to drive your vehicle if you think they might be intoxicated.

However, it should be noted that someone who owns a vehicle might also be a party to a DUI under Tennessee Code Annotated § 55-10-201 (see sect. 5 immediately above).

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* “DUI by Consent” and “DUI by Ownership” are descriptive phrases, and not used as legal terms defined by law.

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CONCLUSION

These are just some of the interesting issues that can arise in a DUI case.  DUIs can be complex in nature and often require an attorney skilled in defending DUI cases.  If you or someone you know has been charged with a DUI or other crime, contact attorney Nicholas W. Lee today for a free case consultation.

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*“Defending Tennessee” is a privately-ran legal blog and is not a public legal aid agency.

The author of Defending Tennessee is Nicholas W. Lee, Esq., an attorney in Knoxville, Tennessee.  Click here for Mr. Lee’s contact information.  Also, please feel free to visit Mr. Lee’s website, www.TNLawyerLee.com or follow his page on Facebook for updates as to his law practice or new posts to TNLawyerLee by clicking here.

The information on this site is general information and should not be construed as legal advice. Every case is unique and you should consult with an attorney in your state about the specific details of your case. Nothing on this site or in correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as forming an attorney-client relationship and information you send prior to the forming of an attorney-client relationship may not be kept confidential. Neither this site nor correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as a promise nor as undertaking a duty regarding you or your case. Nicholas Lee and his agents are not retained as your legal counsel unless a valid written Representation Agreement is reached regarding your specific case.

Copyright © 2013. Nicholas W. Lee, Attorney at Law. All rights reserved. This site’s content may not be used without the prior written consent of Nicholas Lee.

Alcohol Poisoning: Recognizing the Risk

Picture this.  You and a good friend are out drinking (it could be New Year’s Eve, someone’s birthday celebration, or just a Friday night).  You go first to one bar, then another.  Each of you has more than a few drinks.  One of you notices that it is getting late and so you take a cab home.  But when you get there, your friend wants to continue celebrating and so you break open a bottle of liquor.  Both of you have far too much to drink, but you can’t recall how much you have had.  Suddenly, your friend is vomiting in the bathroom and then passes out.

Quick, what are the signs of alcohol poisoning?  What symptoms should you look for to decide whether your friend’s life might be at risk?

This post is not designed to encourage binge drinking, nor is it designed to scare you away from drinking responsibly.  But knowing the symptoms of alcohol poisoning could save a life.

According to the Mayo Clinic, you should look for the following symptoms to determine if someone is at risk of having alcohol poisoning:

  • Confusion, stupor
  • Vomiting
  • Seizures
  • Slow breathing (less than eight breaths a minute)
  • Irregular breathing (a gap of more than 10 seconds between breaths)
  • Blue-tinged skin or pale skin
  • Low body temperature (hypothermia)
  • Unconsciousness (“passing out”), and can’t be roused

(http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/alcohol-poisoning/DS00861/DSECTION=symptoms).

The Mayo Clinic advises that “[i]t’s not necessary for all of these symptoms to be present before you seek help. A person who is unconscious or can’t be roused is at risk of dying.”  If you want to read more about alcohol poisoning, click on this link (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/alcohol-poisoning/DS00861).

Finally, let me conclude by acknowledging that many of the Friends of the Firm read this blog for simple explanations on points of law, such as posts about DUIs or updates on the law.  While this post is not directly about a specific crime or point of law, it is my hope that this post will help at least one reader and so will have been worth writing.

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The author of TNLawyerLee is Nicholas W. Lee, Esq., an attorney in Knoxville, Tennessee.  If you or someone you know need an attorney, please click here for Mr. Lee’s contact information and contact him today for a free consultation.  Also, please feel free to visit Mr. Lee’s website, www.TNLawyerLee.com or follow his page on Facebook for updates as to his law practice or new posts to TNLawyerLee by clicking here.

The information on this site is general information and should not be construed as legal advice. Every case is unique and you should consult with an attorney in your state about the specific details of your case. Nothing on this site or in correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as forming an attorney-client relationship and information you send prior to the forming of an attorney-client relationship may not be kept confidential. Neither this site nor correspondence with Nicholas Lee or his agents shall be construed as a promise nor as undertaking a duty regarding you or your case. Nicholas Lee and his agents are not retained as your legal counsel unless a valid written Representation Agreement is reached regarding your specific case.

Copyright © 2012. Nicholas W. Lee, Attorney at Law. All rights reserved. This site’s content may not be used without the prior written consent of Nicholas Lee.